The 19th Century Revolution

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Our modern (or contemporary) world has its origins in the 19th century. Particularly in regard to developments in politics, economics and in the Industrial Revolution which occurred in Europe (including Russia) and in the US and which spread in a significant manner to Japan during the 19th century.

It seems these developments have spread across our modern world to such a significant degree that countries today are considered "modernized" or "developing" in regard to how they compare with what emerged from the 19th century in Europe and the US.



In considering the 19th century, it might be helpful to expand its time period from perhaps the American Revolution to the outbreak of WW I in 1914. Of course, a more firm starting point could be the French Revolution.



For 1,000 years and more Europe had been dominated by blood and religious faith, or the aristocracy and the Christian religion. Apparently this circumstance mostly dissolved in the 19th century as an emerging non-aristocratic citizenry challenged the political power of the aristocracy while secularism and a new materialism ascended. It took WW I to remove from power the last European emperor, kaiser and czar.

Many things developed during (and emerged from) the 19th century. It seems the Industrial Revolution is still proceeding (having evolved into our modern Technology Revolution.) A growing middle class desired democratic societies. Darwin happened. So did Nietzsche. So did Dostoyevsky. And so did Marx (eventually one-third of all the people in the whole world would be ruled by governments and regimes based on a 19th-century social/economic/political philosophy.)



Among the many revolutions which occurred in the 19th century (some failed, some succeeded) there was also a revolution in the Arts. Painters broke free from traditional ways of depicting reality, and this continues today. A more modern kind of literature developed (especially in regard to crime novels, which continue to be best-sellers in the US. Thank you Mr. Poe, Mr. Doyle, and Mr. Dostoyevsky.) Mr. Verne began writing sci-fi tales.



It seems, in regard to the making of our modern world -- worldwide --the 19th century might have been the pivotal turning point in history. Would you agree? Disagree?



Can anyone add some knowledge and detail in regard to the things which developed or originated in the 19th century? Nationalism? Imperialism? Atheism? Socialism? Capitalism as well as Marxism? Also, Feminism, the embryonic but growing movement for equal rights for women? Ground-breaking inventions? What about developments in other parts of the world during the 19th century such as in Asia, India, Africa, South America, etc.?

What things have I left out or missed (or gotten wrong?)

27 comments:

lolcifer said...

nice stuff, following your blog! follow mine if you are interested in music and technology!

Lexingtonian said...

The 19th century was definitely packed with many social changes that would impact the world forever. Good read!

bbmike15 said...

awesome blog i love history but seriously
Marx can suck a fat one

The Governor said...

oh good ol' carl marks

Peter Hildebrand said...

I've always though that the 19th century was the beginning of a very well defined cause and effect that ended in where we are today.

WW1 caused WW2, which caused the cold war, which caused the space race, which caused the massive explosion in technology that we have today.

And that's just one chain. I would agree that a lot of the stuff from the 19th century created the modern world.

This is definitely one of the best blogs I've decided to follow in quite a while!

Svipis said...

Remember those guys from school time

724427 said...

Nice insight, will continue to read more of your posts.

seamagpie said...

you are right 19th century was a golden age

YetAnotherUnreadBlogger said...

Gotta love a bit of history.

Mihai-Edrisch said...

I totally agree with your 19th century idea.
Great post! So clever!

Anonfourtwenty said...

Damn dude, this is an epic idea for a blog. I will be interested to see what follows!

dead_mike said...

Very nice!

gekomaster said...

I enjoyed reading this, hope others can answer your questions...take care!

Eric P said...

I know it's a bit obscure, but what about the aesthetic movement of Oscar Wilde and the pre-Raphaelites before him? He was also a campaigner (with his wife) for women's dress reform. Something we don't really think of as being important now, but was certainly shaped by his exploits in the 19th century.

Guys I'm Freaking Out!!! said...

This is actually a pretty good overview. All I really can contribute would be the use of isms in modern literature.

8bitAcidTrip said...

Good read. I look forward to more .

Lost.in.Idaho said...

Great read. I'm gonna look more into the 19th century and it's influence on modern times before I contribute. My history is a little sketchy...

metaphysicalfarms said...

great review!

9000SpaceMan said...

Very interesting. ;)

Daily Music said...

great article. keep up the good work. definitely coming back in the future

Mr. Nobody said...

Interesting read.

thatinsidejoke said...

awesome! very informative. following and supporting!!

Matt said...

I don't know if you'd consider it "missed," but I find it curious that Lincoln did a lot of the same things in the US that Bismarck did in Germany in the 19th century (consolidation of a stronger federal state). Keep up with the blog! I love it!

Kreybane said...

Sad to see that there are no longer any great minds as there were back then...

Paul Welch said...

Cool blog man.

Marxism originated at the Frankfurt School, and their main goal was a workers revolution, and their ideology was in place to destroy the Christian and Free market roots of the West, which they felt was holding back a workers revolution.

Im following your blog. Check out mine too at paulwelchonit.blogspot.com

Byakuya said...

I'd say you got it spot on.

Great article. Keep it up.

Siphil said...

The telegraph, the great great great granddaddy of the Internet is an important one. Also anything Nikola Tesla did, although that was late 19th early 20th century.

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